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Root growth responses of parthenium weed and different pasture plants under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

Authors:

N. Khan ,

The University of Queensland, AU
About N.
Tropical and Sub-Tropical Weed Research Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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Z. Hanif,

The University of Queensland, AU
About Z.
Tropical and Sub-Tropical Weed Research Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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I.A. Khan,

The University of Agriculture, PK
About I.A.
Department of Weed Science
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K. Naveed,

University of Haripur, PK
About K.
Department of Agricultural Sciences
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A. Shabbir,

The University of Queensland, AU
About A.
Tropical and Sub-Tropical Weed Research Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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S.W. Adkins

The University of Queensland, AU
About S.W.
Tropical and Sub-Tropical Weed Research Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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Abstract

Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) is an alien invasive species reducing pasture productivity and livestock production in Australia and other countries around the world. Three C4 pasture grasses (Setaria incrassata, Astrebla squarrosa and Bothriochloa decipiens) and one C3 pasture legume species (Clitoria ternatea), all previously known to be suppressive of the growth of parthenium weed under ambient CO2 (390 μmolmol-1), were re-tested under an elevated atmospheric CO2 (550 μmolmol-1) level in a controlled environment growth chamber. When grown alone and under elevated atmospheric CO2 level, the root dry biomass of S. incrassata and A. squarrosa did not get affected significantly, whereas that of B. decipiens, C. ternatea and P. hysterophorus significantly increased by 10, 34 and 26 %, respectively. When S. incrassata and A. squarrosa were grown together with parthenium weed under the same conditions, their root dry biomass reduced by 20 and 16 %, while that of B. decipiens and C. ternatea was increased by 7 and 28 %, respectively. The root to shoot ratio of S. incrassata and A. squarrosa decreased significantly by 24 and 16 %, while that of B. decipiens, C. ternatea and parthenium weed increased by 6, 17 and 12 %, respectively, under the same conditions. These results have important implications for the management of parthenium weed in future climate scenarios involving elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. Our results suggest that some pasture species with the potential to suppress the growth of parthenium weed under the present climate will remain an important tool in managing pastures invaded by parthenium weed in the future.

How to Cite: Khan, N., Hanif, Z., Khan, I.A., Naveed, K., Shabbir, A. and Adkins, S.W., 2018. Root growth responses of parthenium weed and different pasture plants under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. Journal of the National Science Foundation of Sri Lanka, 46(3), pp.303–310. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/jnsfsr.v46i3.8482
Published on 30 Sep 2018.
Peer Reviewed

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