Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Selected Sri Lankan food plants and other herbs as potential sources of inulin-type fructans

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Research Articles

Selected Sri Lankan food plants and other herbs as potential sources of inulin-type fructans

Authors:

DC Mudannayake,

LK
About DC
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science and Export Agriculture, Uva Wellassa University, Badulla
X close

KMS Wimalasiri ,

LK
About KMS
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya.
X close

KFST Silva,

LK
About KFST
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya.
X close

S Ajlouni

AU
About S

Bioscience Section, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.

X close

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the inulin-type fructan content in 20 selected food plants and other herbs commonly found in Sri Lanka. The inulin content of the selected plants were determined qualitatively and quantitatively using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and enzymatic spectrophotometric (ES) methods, respectively. The ES results showed that the inulin-type fructan contents based on fresh weight was highest in Allium sativum (18.62 % ± 1.55), followed by Asparagus falcatus (17.74 % ± 2.92), Asparagus racemosus (11.8 3% ± 0.87), Allium cepa (8.60 % ± 0.88), Allium ampeloprasum (6.20 % ± 0.23), Taraxacum javanicum (5.77 % ± 1.53) and Vernonia cinerea (4.55 % ± 0.93), respectively. Taraxacum javanicum and Vernonia cinerea plant extracts developed distinct blue black spots with the detection reagent on TLC plates similar to chicory inulin standard. However, Allium ampeloprasum, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Asparagus falcatus and Asparagus racemosus developed thicker blue black streaks on TLC plates due to their higher inulin concentration, which confirmed the ES results. Aloe vera, Alpinia calcarata, Amophophallus campanulatus, Beta vulgaris, Canna indica, Diascorea alata and Sonchus oleraceus contained low levels (1 ≤ 0.5 g/100 g FW) of inulin while Caryota urens, Ipomoea batatas, Lasia spinosa and Maranta arundinacea contained very low levels or no (< 0.4 g/100 g FW) inulin.

J.Natn.Sci.Foundation Sri Lanka 2015 43 (1): 35 – 43


How to Cite: Mudannayake, D., Wimalasiri, K., Silva, K. and Ajlouni, S., 2015. Selected Sri Lankan food plants and other herbs as potential sources of inulin-type fructans. Journal of the National Science Foundation of Sri Lanka, 43(1), pp.35–43. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/jnsfsr.v43i1.7913
Published on 31 Mar 2015.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus